The USMC Survival Kit

I have seen a few of these sold online and I always wanted to get my hands on one.

Ever the skeptic, I wondered if the people who were selling them were being honest about them. The packaging seemed to be from the military, but I could not find anyone that knew anything about them. Including a couple of Marines, one who was in about 12 years ago, and someone who just got out a couple years ago. One even commented that the Corps made them purchase a mini-compass for their watchband as well as a Multi-Tool and bandana, etc. (Considering there are Leatherman and Gerber Multi-Tools as well as a wrist compass in the National Inventory, this seems rather sad. But as it was explained to me, the USMC is not funded very well. It’s just another reason to be proud of the Marine Corps, they do it all on a fraction of what the other branches “get by” on.)

You see, when you want to sell something nowadays, it is quite common to start hanging titles on the equipment/item. Titles like, “Spec-Ops, Rangers, Special Forces, Delta Force, Navy SEALs,” or even “Marine Corps” or “Marine Force Recon.” (Look out for “Ninja Death Dealing Equipment” too…)

I guess the peddlers never got around to finding out about USMC F.A.S.T. or you would see that all over the place too.

I can’t tell you how many knives and other pieces of equipment, some of them absolute trash, that had “Delta Force” or some other SpecOps name attached to it to place the sales hook in some unsuspecting teenager somewhere in Anyplace, USA.

Or much more disturbing, a completely ignorant adult…who buys this rubbish…both the gear and the advertising.

It is an absolutely pathetic thing to see a common, flea-market grade, cheaply made, imported from a sweatshop in the Third World, “Survival Knife” being sold as somehow being associated with the Military.

So, I started one of my “informal inquiries” (meaning - I went digging and stuff…). I was trying to find out if these “USMC Force Recon Survival Kits” were actually made by someone and being sold with the “Force Recon” sales hook, or if were they put together by someone in the Military…

While searching through various NSNs (National Stock Numbers), I came upon a PDF Document from The Department of The Navy. The document is dated 9 July 91.

From the document:

“The SK consists of two sealed pouches that are issued as a single Kit and can be separated after issue. The NSN’s of the components which make up the SK are as follows:

Side A: Shelter and Food Gathering Side:

Fishing Kit, Emergency 4220-00-244-0764

Saw, Finger Ring 5110-00-70-6896 

Survival Blanket 7210-00-935-6666 

Plastic Bag, Zip-Lock 8105-00-837-7755            

Candle, Votive 9925-00-202-4417                  

Snare Wire 9525-00-59-63498

Side B: Escape and Evasion (E & E) Side:

Fire Starter, Magnesium 4240-01-160-5618 

Knife, Pocket 5110-00-162-2205  

Signalling Mirror 6350-00-105-1252 

Compass, Smoke Chaser 6605-00-553-87-95

Plastic Bag, Zip-Lock 8105-00-837-7756

Whistle, Extreme Cold 8465-01-278-6982

Water Bag, Drinking 8466-00-634-4499

Matches, Waterproof 9920-01-191-3434”

I am lifting excerpts as I go along, bear with me…

It continues…under “Operational characteristics…”

The SK is designed for use by individuals serving as members of the Ground Combat Element (GCE). This SK prevents Marines from having to purchase or requisition their own survival items. This SK enables a Marine to perform the basic survival tasks of making shelter, gathering food and water and signaling. The SK is a general purpose kit, but it was developed for use in desert; mountain; arctic; and temperate water survival during small boat operations. The intent of the SK is to have Marines carry it when there is a possibility that they will be placed in a rescue or survival situation. Formal school or unit training should allow an individual to learn the specific application of the SK and its individual components. The SK is sealed so that it can be quickly and visually inspected to determine if it is complete. The seal should only be opened when a Marine is confronted with a survival situation. The SK is packaged in a sand colored, abrasion resistant, waterproof outer bag that is heat sealed around the perimeter and center to form two separate sides. Both sides have inner bags that are transparent, waterproof, vaporproof, and greaseproof. The inner bags are vacuum heat sealed. The two-sided design allows a Marine to carry the SK as a single item in a rucksack, butt pack or folded and placed in a trouser cargo pocket. A Marine can also tear the SK’s outer bag in half along the center heat seal and still maintain its storage integrity features. Each half can be carried in the lower pockets of the utility jacket or the Extreme Cold Weather Clothing System (ECWCS) jacket pockets. The components of each side of the SK have been packaged to better accommodate a survival situation. Side A contains those components needed for shelter and food gathering. Side B contains those items a Marine may need to immediately start their escape/evasion and rescue. The overall purpose of the SK is to enhance a Marine’s chances of survival and rescue for 24 hours and beyond.

The document continues on with Marine Corps information, something interesting stated later on…

“The edges of the outer bag can be resealed with a hot clothing iron.”

Pretty neat, huh!

Earlier in the document, the size was listed:

Length: 13 inches

Width: 6 inches

Height: 2 inches

Weight: 1.75 pounds

So, as you can imagine, I was very interested in obtaining one of these complete survival kits. There have been quite a few of them sold on the Internet. I assume that they have been sold in surplus military auctions (or whatever other “channels” exist, I don’t know…) like just about everything else that is not a “restricted item” in the military inventory. For example, there are a plethora of Military-Issue lensatic compasses and strobe lights as well as other survival kits, primarily United States Air Force Survival Kits, complete and sealed, rations, survival vests, you name it and it is out there…

The Marine Corps SK seemed so well thought out that I had to get one to dissect. It was so unique and I wanted to get my hands on one. Added to that was the fact I kept asking Marines if they had heard of it and none had.

So, without further delay, I give you The United States Marine Corps Force Recon Survival Kit.

Two parts, you tear the two pieces and place one in the left pocket of BDU Pants and the other in the right pocket. Separate as I have done below.

Side A opened and contents shown…

Side B opened and contents shown…

Here is a close up of both sides of the kit, showing what is in them…

Before we break down what is actually in the USMC SK, here is yet another interesting excerpt from a different document…on survival ideas/training from the Marine Corps.

“UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS

Mountain Warfare Training Center

Bridgeport, California

SML

SMO

03/31/01

b. As part of the basic uniform, each man will be required to have in his possession, at all times, seven required pocket items. These seven items should be carried in the pockets of your utility uniform:

(1) Pocketknife

(2) Whistle

(3) Pressure Bandage

(4) Chapstick and sunscreen

(5) Sunglasses

(6) Survival Kit:  

(a) Fire starting items

(b) Signaling items

(c) Food gathering items

(d) Water procuring items

(e) First aid items

(f) Shelter items

(7) Notebook with pen/pencil

c. Some additional items that should be carried in your pockets at all times:

(1) Contact gloves

(2) Paracord (10 meters)

(3) Flashlight with tactical lens and spare batteries

(4) Chemlights”

So, the Marine Corps has a solid survival doctrine, very well thought out. But when you look back to what The Boy Scouts of America used to be known for (I have no idea what they are doing now, not an insult, just an observation…they eliminated Quarterstaff and that was bad enough as far as I’m concerned…) is this so much different? “Be prepared.” I agree…

I’m not saying that the USMC SK is THE doctrine, I’m saying, “look at the mindset.” They want the Marines to be carrying these sorts of things at all times when they are operational.

This carries over to everyone else in society as well. Look at what the Marine is supposed to carry, it’s common sense for anyone and you should take the advice. Add a couple LED flashlights and you have a good emergency kit. Add some granola bars, MetRx bars and other things…excellent!

Comments on some of the contents

I can’t believe that there is a National Stock Number (NSN) assigned to a single Zip-lock baggy! Make the bad man stop!

Yet, there is, and this USMC SK contained not one, but two of them. Can you believe it? I’m not saying they don’t have a use! I’m just saying, it has a NSN! Can you believe it?

There is also a dedicated water bag! This bag is not a “baggy” like those mentioned above, no, this bag is quite tough. Much thicker material with more secure closure. I’d like to obtain some more of these, they are great.

The signal mirror in the kit is a top notch (small) Starflash Survival/Signal Mirror, 2 inches by 3 inches. No lanyard supplied, but that is not a big concern. The face of the mirror is protected by what appears to be a heavy vinyl cover that has a “clean” adhesive, meaning, you can peel it off and it does not leave a residue, etc.

(Now if we can just get Waldenbooks and B. Dalton Books to use this adhesive on their price labels… In fact, I wish the O.D. green duct tape that sealed the fishing kit was the same stuff!)

The mirror was included in a box. The box takes up space in the kit until you realize you can take the box and shred it and have tinder!

Ditto on the compass included in the kit, it was also in a similar cardboard box. Good thing too, there is no “ready” tinder in this kit like I have seen in some U.S. Air Force Survival Kits.

The compass is a Brunton. It has a base and a small magnifying area built into the base. One shoestring lanyard and instructions included.

The USMC could have went the way of the Army and Air Force kits and used the wrist compass in the National Inventory or went all the way and used the lensatic compass. However, Ken Cook pointed out to me, they probably wanted to keep the cost down and the Brunton was cheaper than the Issue lensatic and the Brunton was probably more robust than the wrist compass.

For quite a few weeks, Ken Cook and I were bantering back and forth about the listed contents of the kit. We were like, “What in the hell is a ‘Smoke Chaser?’”

I asked another Marine who just got out a little while ago, he didn’t know what the hell a “Smoke Chaser” was either.

Apparently, this model of Brunton is known as the “Smoke Chaser.”

The actual compass is very similar, the compass itself, not the base or the bezel, very similar to the Brunton Trail Buster.

Late 2006 UPDATE - Several people have E-mailed me and informed me as to what a "Smoke Chaser" happens to be. Ken and I knew what a "Smoke Chaser" was, we just didn't think you could fit a full-sized Firefighter into this kit. Apparently I was not clear enough in what I wrote, I was wondering what a "Smoke Chaser" could be that was small enough to fit into a survival kit. So, rest easy, I just worded it incorrectly...

More Fire!

So, we have a small box of Hurricane Matches, I think the kit would have been much better if it had the NATO/British Lifeboat Matches, but that is just me. These Hurricane Matches will do in a pinch, better than some of the other stuff like books of regular paper matches that are found in other kits.

And there is a standard Doan Magnesium Bar with flint rod mounted in/on the side. Can’t argue with that! A classic piece of survival gear.

What about more fire? Yeah, well, I pointed out the boxes for the compass and signal mirror that could be used as tinder if properly prepared, i.e., shredded and fuzzed up with the edge of a pocketknife…

Well, I’m not talking about the two “official” Zip-lock baggies I found so amusing (you can place small items in them or when foraging for food, place that in the large Zip-lock baggies, etc.), there were a few others as well. The brass snare wire was in a smaller Zip-lock bag and then secured by tape, and then there are the other pieces of plastic packaging for all of these devices that could be used to get some stubborn wood burning quickly.

So, a Marine who was interested in getting some intense heat going to light a stubborn fire could use this plastic wrap if he wanted to be found. Most Citizens will be concerned with being rescued; a smokey fire could be a lifesaving thing. The theoretical Marine I am talking about would NOT want to do this if he were in an E & E (SERE, etc.) type of situation where discovery might mean death, capture or re-capture. No, he would want to sit tight with a clean fire if he could have that luxury and then use the strobe, mirror or other means to selectively contact aircraft, etc.

Plastic, when burning, gives off a nasty, sooty, black smoke that could cause some problems for the Escaper/Evader. But, make no mistake, a simple, very small Zip-lock bag or one of these other pieces of plastic, wrapped around some twigs – when ignited, will stick to the wood like napalm as it catches and melts…and then drips onto other fuel (tinder, kindling, etc.) below it. And knowing that, this should be taken advantage of. (Again, if you’re not cheating, you’re not trying…)

Like many kids who go camping, I spent many dozens of hours gathering anything that could be incinerated and then depositing it onto the fire. Much to the chagrin and maniacal screaming of my Dad.

“You’re going to kill us all! That’s corrugated fiberglass!”

But it sure does burn hot Dad…

And it was smokey…and it was nasty and it stunk to be all damned. But it sure did make a July day seem…well, like a hotter July day! And I found a lot of it too. Like three feet long sheets that I then set out to break apart and twist into pieces – about one foot by one foot chunks, the nasty green stuff…

What a fire!

I even managed to get a pile of dried Poison Ivy onto a campfire once…which brought on another cacophony of verbal doom that involved a lot of profanity and the detailed description of what that could do to my breathing apparatus…

But I digress.

There is also a votive candle in the SK. Mine got a bit moshed in the packing and carrying of this kit. The outside of my kit looks like it went through absolute hell. It was probably carried and exposed to a lot of heat as the candle is deformed.

Fishing Kit

This is an AWESOME little fishing kit. Packed in a rather tough little aluminum tin and included in the USMC SK. My aluminum tin was moshed quite a bit, like the candle, apparently someone rucked out with my USMC SK and treated it rather badly. But that is interesting as well because the compass performs flawlessly anyway…one tough Brunton.

(This is the USAF designation for the survival fishing kit:

Air Force Survival Fishing Kit (USAF)

US Air Force pilots survival fishing kit DLA750-92-D-4020-0001)

When I removed the green military duct tape from around the fishing kit’s tin, I was hoping that the tape was some sort of Gaffer’s Tape as you see on British Penrith Tins. It is apparently what is known in the military as, “100” or “90 MPH Tape.” Good tape but leaves an incredible amount of intensely sticky adhesive. Unlike the Gaffer’s Tape which you see on the better British SAS Tins which sticks very well, at least as well as regular duct tape, yet when you remove it leaves just about zero adhesive residue.

In the fishing kit I found a yellow piece of cloth with various (good) sewing needles placed through the cloth to hold them in place. They all showed rust and the majority of them were basically destroyed by rust.

A red piece of cloth contained several heavy-duty, large safety pins. These are excellent! They appear to be brass and coated black.  

I think if they would place the sewing needles inside a small, plastic vial of some sort. That should keep them from rusting. My guess is the needles have a high carbon content and they collected residual moisture left in the piece of cloth and then rusted. Nothing else is rusted in the fishing kit or the USMC SK overall, these are the only items that have rusted which leads me to believe they are absorbing moisture from the yellow piece of cloth.

I was curious about this because the kit was obviously prepared quite well and vacuum-sealed by itself, then sealed into the USMC SK as well. I obtained another one of the fishing kits, solo, and that review will be posted on my website as soon as this one goes up. So, I refer you to that article for more information on this sub-kit within the USMC Survival Kit.

The Wire Saw

This is the best Wire Saw that I have ever owned, period. Hands down winner.

I used Wire Saws in various Survival Knives and Kits in the 1980s and they were all abysmal. I never found one that could do much without breaking, even after experimenting with various ways of using it and carefully trying not to twist it or overheat it through friction, etc.

I have three basic types of Wire Saws now, this U.S. Military Wire Saw, the Varco Wire Saw which is marketed as being used by the U.S. Military (but it is different from this Saw, don’t confuse the two…) and British Military Saws used in their Survival Tins.

The Saw in the USMC SK is the finest, best of breed. Not only does it come with an extra blade, if you break the blade, you can release the broken portion of blade and then reinsert another portion of the saw and carry on with a shorter saw! An excellent piece of gear, to say the least.

There are two blades and two pieces of machined metal. Each piece of metal has a small hole drilled into it; this is where the end of the Wire Saw is inserted. It is then tightened down in place by a threaded thumb turn screw. A finger-ring on each of these devices makes for easy use as well.

I would like to have a few of these little devices manufactured with the hole enlarged so it could accept British Wire Saws as well as the Varco Wire Saw. Then you could simply cut the ends off of those two types of saws and have dedicated handles for them. Breaking one would also not mean the end of the tool’s usefulness either; you could reinsert the broken portion as you can with this U.S. Military Saw…

I might just have to get my hands on a few more of these saws and then take the small, metal devices somewhere and use a drill press to enlarge the holes myself so they accept the other types of Wire Saws.

The Innocuous “Demo” Knife

I had a couple of these when I was a kid and lost them. These are Plain Jane pocketknives but they sure are tough! These are some of the toughest non-locking folding knives I have ever used. Let me clarify that upon reflection, this is the toughest non-locking knife I have ever had. I’ve never had a “bad” standard, U.S. G.I. pocketknife either.

It’s nice to have another one now. It really is a great pocketknife.

Some people, like so many in life, may turn their nose up at this pocketknife. Especially since it has no lock. I understand the concerns that some people have, but I really have to say, if all of their painful bitching and moaning about locks were true, a half dozen kids I grew up with (myself included) should look like Yakuza Members from a childhood spent with non-locking folding knives. Considering the volume of squealing from some of these people, there should be a whole lot of missing fingers. I have known two people in my entire life that were missing fingers. One was from an accident involving too much beer and a circular saw… The other was a childhood accident involving an old washing machine.

I’m not telling you a non-locking pocketknife is superior to a lock-blade. I’m telling you to learn how to use tools and ignore the people who tell you otherwise. If you have a pocketknife with no lock, treat it with care and use it with caution. Don’t be just another terrified person. And if you are someone who advocates locking blades only, know this, I may or may not be talking about you. I tend to dismiss those who stamp their feet and insist that people are too stupid to use a lock-less folding knife without maiming themselves. To me, this is absurd. Locks are certainly preferred! But I would not condemn a good, solid pocketknife like this one because it does not have a lock.

I think this attitude goes back to the way you were raised. If your Dad, Uncle or Brother beat on things with a crescent wrench instead of fetching the hammer when they were working on something, you are probably going to use a knife the wrong way too.

It is supposed to be “bad form” to quote yourself, but I touched on this in another article on this site when it comes to “survival knives.” Even if I were in possession of one of these Super-Duper Knives that you can beat on rocks with, I would not use it for anything like that in a survival situation. The finest knife can have a fatal flaw hidden in that steel.

I feel the same way about locks. I prefer a folder with a lock, but even on those that do…I use caution and I don’t push the envelope too much. I hate to harp on this sort of thing, I just find some people to be sort of strange about some things. I’m not kidding; if what they say is true, I should be missing a digit or two. I spent a lot of time with various locking and non-locking knives from Buck, Case, Uncle Henry, Schrade and Old Timer when I was younger. It’s not that I do not value my fingers, as some would suggest, I simply think you should use tools carefully and properly and I was taught to do so. I don’t trust safeties on firearms and they are just another type of safety lock when you think about it. I trust everything as much as I have to and use caution.

Anyway, it’s all about influence as far as I’m concerned.

For some more on the Demo Knife, take a look at what Ken Cook has to say about them…by clicking on THIS LINK.

(Clicking on the link to read Ken’s article will take you to another page on my website, please use your browser’s back button to return to this page, thanks!)

Conclusions

This survival kit would be great to toss into a daypack when you go hunting, hiking, fishing or camping – as always, just in case something bad happens. You can survive a lot of terrible weather, etc., if you just have a helping hand and this kit and the knowledge to use it is just that type of “helping hand.”

During the first part of December 2003, there was a group of people that went camping in one of the New England States. Well, as luck would have it, a Nor’Easter struck and quite a bit of snow fell in that area. Even where I am, the news ran a story about these people stranded out in the snow…somewhere, as if the media were salivating at the prospect of a mini-replay of The Donner Party to happen, you know, just to boost their ratings…

Well, this group of people, because they were already prepared for cold weather camping, they came out all right. Knowledge, not freaking out when something unexpected or dangerous happens and some proper equipment can make the difference not only between comfort and misery, but also between life and death as well…

You could place this kit in a pack, the pockets of a large jacket – especially if you are a hunter and you have one of the older (coveted) hunting jackets that have small game pockets in the lower back portion and/or front-inside of the jacket/coat. This kit would fit into some of those old coats, day packs, butt packs, or you could simply purchase an old .50 caliber machinegun ammunition can. Check out the gasket and make sure it is in good shape and store this kit inside the can as well as other items in there – keeping it in your vehicle, trunk, behind seat, in a truck’s toolbox. Use your imagination.

20mm cannon ammunition cans are even larger and are quite attractive to those with large SUVs, etc. You can make one hell of a survival kit with a .50 Cal. Or 20mm ammo can. Think of them as large, watertight survival tins! (My Dad was quite fond of milk crates as well as .30 and .50 Cal. Ammo cans.)

Here is another picture of the complete kit:

1.     Wire Saw and Handles

2.     Hurricane Matches

3.     Magnesium Firestarter

4.     DEMO KNIFE!

5.     (Votive) Candle

6.     Starflash Signal Mirror

7.     Whistle

8.     Brass Snare Wire

9.     Brunton Smoke Chaser Compass

10. Space Blanket, a/k/a Casualty Blanket

11. Zip-Lok Baggies, two

12. Water Storage Bag

13. Fishing Kit

Next is a hard copy of the PDF materials concerning this USMC SK.


USMC SURVIVAL KIT PDF DOCUMENT COPY

MCO 1543.3

C2I

9 Jul 91

MARINE CORPS ORDER 1543.3 W/CH 1

From: Commandant of the Marine Corps

To: Distribution List

Subj: MATERIEL FIELDING PLAN FOR THE SURVIVAL KIT (SK), INDIVIDUAL

Encl: (1) Materiel Fielding Plan for the Survival Kit (SK), Individual

1. Purpose. The enclosure provides information and instructions concerning the fielding of the Survival Kit (SK).

2. Information. The SK contains components that provide the user with the ability to survive in conditions or situations that force them to operate without logistical support or replenishment. The SK will enhance a Marine’s ability to survive for at least 24 hours and provides the capability of acquiring the four basic life support needs: fire, water, food, and signaling.

3. Action. The commanders of each organizational element concerned shall ensure implementation of the provisions of this Order.

4. Reserve Applicability. This Order is applicable to the Marine Corps Reserve.

DISTRIBUTION: PCN 10201834900

Copy to: 7000110 (55)

8145005 (2)

7000144/8145001 (1)

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY

HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS

WASHINGTON, DC 20380-0001

MCO 1543.3 Ch 1

CBGR

22 Aug 94

MARINE CORPS ORDER 1543.3 CH 1

From: Commandant of the Marine Corps

To: Distribution List

Subj: MATERIEL FIELDING PLAN FOR THE SURVIVAL KIT (SK), INDIVIDUAL

Encl: (1) New page inserts to MCO 1543.3

1. Purpose. To transmit new page inserts and direct pen changes to the basic Order.

2. Action

a. Remove appendix A to enclosure (1) and replace with the corresponding page contained in the enclosure.

b. Remove enclosure (1), page 1, and replace with the corresponding page contained in the enclosure.

c. Enclosure (1), page 2, paragraph 1c(2), delete second sentence.

d. Enclosure (1), page 2, paragraph 2a(3), change from "3" to "1."

e. Enclosure (1), page 5, paragraph 3d(2), change the first sentence to read "Components of the SK will be requisitioned from the listed source of supply."

f. Enclosure (1), page 5, paragraph 3f, change last sentence to read "SL 3-09475A, PCN 123 094750 00 applies."

g. Enclosure (1), page 6, paragraph 4b(2), in first sentence delete "a new survival kit through" and replace with "replacement components from the" and after supply add "and reconstitute the kit using information in paragraph 2a(5) and heat sealing procedures in paragraph 3i(1) above." Delete second sentence.

DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for public release;

distribution is unlimited. 3

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY

HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS

WASHINGTON, DC 20380-0001

MCO 1543.3 Ch 1

22 Aug 94

3. Filing Instructions. File this Change transmittal immediately behind the signature page of the basic Order.

DISTRIBUTION: PCN 10201834901

Copy to: 7000110 (55)

8145005 (2)

7000099, 144/8145001/7230057 (1)

MATERIEL FIELDING PLAN

FOR THE SURVIVAL KIT (SK) INDIVIDUAL

1. Introduction

a. Source of Requirement. See Required Operational Capability (ROC) INS 211.4.1. dated 23 May 1990.

b. Points of Contact Command/Telephone

PROJECT OFFICER ASSISTANT PROJECT OFFICER SURVIVAL KIT

SURVIVAL KIT

MARCORSYSCOM (CBGR) MARCORSYSCOM (CBGR)

2033 BARNETT AVE SUITE 315 2033 BARNETT AVE SUITE 315

QUANTICO VA 22134-5010 QUANTICO VA 22134-5010

DSN: 278-2914 DSN: 278-2775

COML: (703) 640-2914 COML: (703) 640-2775

ILS OFFICER WEAPONS SYSTEM MANAGER

SURVIVAL KIT

COMMARCORLOGBASES (CODE 835-1)

MARCORSYSCOM (CBGR) 814 RADFORD BLVD

2033 BARNETT AVE SUITE 315 ALBANY GA 31704-1128

QUANTICO VA 22134-5010 DSN: 567-6534

DSN: 278-2912 COML: (912) 439-6534

COML: (703) 640-2912

c. Fielding Methodology

(1) General Fielding Plan. The Survival Kits (SK’s) will be fielded vertically in order to satisfy commands that have a higher order priority need for the SK’s. See appendix A for the allowances and delivery schedule and appendix B for the schedule of events. Units that have a higher risk of having individuals in survival situations have SK’s listed on their Tables of Equipment (T/E). Training commands have allowances in support of formal training. The Training Allowance Pool (TAP) quantities are available for other units during deployments when the environment or other operational conditions warrant. * (2) Method of Fielding. The initial provisioning will be force fed to units by priority. Supply System Responsibility Items (SSRI) or Using Unit Responsibility Items (UURI) should be requisitioned directly from the source of supply.

d. Replaced Systems/Equipment. None.

2. System Description

a. Administrative Information

(1) Nomenclature. Survival Kit, Individual.

(2) TAMCN. C3443IIEP.

* (3) SAC. 1.

(4) NSN. 1680-01-325-7861.

(5) The SK consists of two sealed pouches that are issued as a single Kit and can be separated after issue. The NSN’s of the components which make up the SK are as follows:

Side A: Shelter and Food Gathering Side:

(a) Fishing Kit, Emergency 4220-00-244-0764

(b) Saw, Finger Ring 5110-00-570-6896

(c) Survival Blanket 7210-00-935-6666

(d) Plastic Bag, Zip-Lock 8105-00-837-7755

(e) Candle, Votive 9925-00-202-4417

(f) Snare Wire 9925-00-596-3498

Side B: Escape and Evasion (E and E) Side:

(g) Fire Starter, Magnesium 1680-01-160-5618

(h) Knife, Pocket 5110-00-162-2205

(i) Signalling Mirror 6350-00-105-1252

(j) Compass, Smoke Chaser 6605-00-553-8795

(k) Plastic Bag, Zip-Lock 8105-00-837-7755

(l) Whistle, Extreme Cold 8465-01-278-6982

(m) Water Bag, Drinking 8465-01-634-4499

(n) Matches, Waterproof 9920-01-191-3434

(6) Unit of Issue. Kit.

(7) Unit Cost. $72.00.

(8) Support Cost. None.

(9) Equipment Density. Normal.

(10) Readiness Reporting. N/A.

(11) Equipment ID Number. 09475A.

b. Physical Characteristics

Operational Storage/Shipping

Configuration

Configuration

(1) Length. 13 in 13 in

(2) Width. 6 in 6 in

(3) Height. 2 in 2 in

(4) Square. .56 ft(2) .56 ft(2)

(5) Cube. .09 ft(3) .09 ft(3)

(6) Weight. 1.75 lbs 1.75 lbs

(7) Stowage. ft(3) ft(3)

(8) Power Requirements None None

c. Operational Characteristics. The SK is designed for use by individuals serving as members of the Ground Combat Element (GCE). This SK prevents Marines from having to purchase or requisition their own survival items. This SK enables a Marine to perform the basic survival tasks of making shelter, gathering food and water, and signaling. The SK is a general purpose kit, but it was developed for use in desert; mountain; arctic; and temperate water survival during small boat operations. The intent of the SK is to have Marines carry it when there is a possibility that they will be placed in a rescue or survival situation. Formal school or unit training should allow an individual to learn the specific application of the SK and its individual components. The SK is sealed so that it can be quickly and visually inspected to determine if it is complete. The seal should only be opened when a Marine is confronted with a survival situation. The SK is packaged in a sand colored, abrasion resistant, waterproof outer bag that is heat sealed around the perimeter and center to form two separate sides. Both sides have inner bags that are transparent, waterproof, vaporproof, and greaseproof. The inner bags are vacuum heat sealed. the two-sided design allows a Marine to carry the SK as a single item in a rucksack, butt pack or folded and placed in a trouser cargo pocket. A Marine can also tear the SK’s outer bag in half along the center heat seal and still maintain its storage integrity features. Each half can be carried in the lower pockets of the utility jacket or the Extreme Cold Weather Clothing System (ECWCS) jacket pockets. The components of each side of the SK have been packaged to better accommodate a survival situation. Side A contains those components needed for shelter and food gathering. Side B contains those items a Marine may need to immediately start their escape/evasion and rescue. The overall purpose of the SK is to enhance a Marine’s chances of survival and rescue for 24 hours and beyond.

d. Associated/Related Systems/Equipment. None.

3. Logistics Support

a. Maintenance Support. The survival kit does not require any additional Military Occupational Specialties (MOS’s) for maintenance. None of the components within the survival kit require maintenance above 1st echelon; user care and cleaning. Any damage made to the packaging of the survival kit or any of its components degrades the service life of the survival kit.

b. Contractor Support Requirements. None.

(1) Depot Support. None.

(2) Interim Contractor Support (ICS). None.

c. Manpower, Personnel, and Training

(1) Personnel Requirements. No impact on current authorizations is required.

(2) Training Requirements. It is appropriate that familiarization be provided by using units, and the schools identified in appendix A, on the proper use of the survival kit and its components. The Marine Corps commands that provide ground survival instruction have been given an allowance.

(3) Training Support Items. None.

d. Supply Support

(1) Provisioning. Initial issue provisioning will not be accomplished. Subject equipment is an initial issue expense item.

* (2) Replenishment. Components of th SK will be requisitioned from the listed source of supply. Initial fielding of the SK will be as a SAC 3 item, although the SAC will be automatically changed to 1 after initial fielding is complete. The owning units will then be responsible for budgeting and funding their operations and maintenance (O&M) funds for the replenishment of any SK’s.

e. Support Equipment. None.

(1) Special Tools. None.

(2) Common Tools. None.

(3) Special Purpose Test Equipment. None.

(4) General Purpose Test Equipment. None.

(5) Test Program Sets. None.

(6) Other Support Equipment. None.

f. Technical Publications (TP). The components of the SK are easy to use. The principles of their operation have been provided in numerous survival courses in the Marine Corps. Specific instructions have been overpacked for the compass, saw, fishing kit, fire starter, signalling mirror and matches. Publication Control Numbers (PCN’s) will not be assigned to these instructions. SL-3-09475a, PCN 123 094750 00 applies.

g. Computer Resources Support. None.

h. Facilities. None.

(1) Existing Facilities. None.

(2) New Facilities. None.

(3) Interim Facilities. None.

i. Packaging, Handling, Storage, and Transportation

(1) Packaging. The components of the SK are packaged in a sand colored, abrasion resistant, waterproof outer bag that is heat sealed around the perimeter and center to form two separate sides (MIL-B-22191D). Both sides have inner bags that are vacuum sealed, transparent, waterproof, vaporproof, and greaseproof (MIL-B-131H). The edges of the outer bag can be resealed with a hot clothing iron.

(2) Handling. No special handling is required.

(3) Storage. No special storage requirements are needed. The survival kit has a shelf life code of zero (0).

(4) Transportability. No special transportability requirements are needed or required.

j. Warranties. None.

4. Actions Required To Place Equipment In Service

a. Commanding Generals, LFTCLant, LFTCPac, MCCDC, MCB Camp Lejeune, and MCB Camp Pendleton shall include the application of this SK in their appropriate formal schools.

b. Gaining Commands

(1) Materiel Defects Reporting. If a survival kit arrives opened or damaged a SF 368 Quality Deficiency Report (QDR) should be submitted to COMMARCORLOGBASES, (808-1), Albany, GA. In addition, if during the use of any of the component items a deficiency occurs, a QDR should also be submitted.

* (2) Obtaining Supporting Consumable. If the inner packaging is opened or any of the components of the survival kit are damaged, the owning unit should requisition replacement components from the source of supply and reconstitute the kit using information in paragraph 2a(5) and heat sealing procedures in paragraph 3i(1) above.

c. MCLB, Albany, GA

(1) Ensure the SAC is changed from 3 to 1 after initial issue is complete.

(2) Function as the Primary Inventory Control Agency (PICA) for the SK.

(3) Coordinate with the CG, MCRDAC (C2I) in order to accomplish the Principal End Item (PEI) transfer.

LIST OF ALLOWANCES AND DELIVERY SCHEDULES

ACTIVE FORCES

FY 91 FY 92

T/E UNIT UNIT QTR QTR

No TITLE ALLOW 2 3 4 1 2 3

N4618 Force Recon Co, 1st SRI Group 238 238

N4718 Force Recon Co, 2d SRI Group 438 438

N4818 Force Recon Co, 3d SRI Group 10 10

N4654 ANGLICO, 1st SRI Group 258 258

N4754 ANGLICO, 2d SRI Group 372 372

N4854 ANGLICO, 3d SRI Group 10 10

N4637 HqSvc Co, 1st Radio Bn 320 320

N4737 HqSvc Co, 2d Radio Bn 400 400

N4835 Det Radio Bn, 3d SRI Group 10 10

N4601 Hq, 1st SRI Group 340 340

N4701 Hq, 2d SRI Group 400 400

N4801 Hq, 3d SRI Group 292 292

N4686 HqSvc Co, Comm Bn, 1st SRI Group 520 520

N4786 HqSvc Co, Comm Bn, 2d SRI Group 700 700

N4886 HqSvc Co, Comm Bn, 3d SRI Group 700 700

N1411 HqSvc Co, 1st Recon Bn 458 458

N1421 HqSvc Co, 2d Recon Bn 458 458

N1431 HqSvc Co, 3d Recon Bn 375 375

B1432 Co A, 3d Recon Bn 88 88

N1711 HqSvc Co, 1st LAI Bn 1008 1008

N1721 HqSvc Co, 2d LAI Bn 1008 1008

N1731 HqSvc Co, 3d LAI Bn 695 695

N1734 Det, 3d LAI Bn 334 334

5980 Amphib Recon School, LFTCLant 15 15

5981 Amphib Recon School, LFTCPac 15 15

7561 School of Infantry, CLNC 525 525

7661 School of Infantry, CPCA 528 528

7671 MWTC Bridgeport, CA 200 200

PWR 2271

Appendix A to

ENCLOSURE (1)

Ch 1 (22 Aug 94)

A-1

MCO 1543.3 Ch 1

22 Aug 94

ACTIVE FORCES

FY-91 FY 92

T/E UNIT UNIT QTR QTR

No TITLE ALLOW 2 3 4 1 2 3

N0001 1st FSSG TAP 16500 16500

N0002 2d FSSG TAP 16500 16500

N0003 3d FSSG TAP 16500 16500

N0004 1st MEB TAP 1000 1000

PWR 3951 3951

Appendix A to

ENCLOSURE (1)

Ch 1 (22 Aug 94)

A-2

MCO 1543.3 Ch 1

22 Aug 94

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

Fielding Begins 2d QTR FY 91

Initiating Service Date 2d QTR FY 91

Start of Production 2d QTR FY 91

Release of Provisioning Projects N/A

Initial Operational Capability 2d QTR FY 91

Appendix B to

ENCLOSURE (1)

B-1


Don Rearic

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